Posted by: catamarantwooceans | October 2, 2014

Back in Curacao

We spent three months at home, a period during which the Middle East experienced difficult times. As I mentioned more than once, this blog is about sailing and is apolitical so I won’t go into any of it here; I’ll only say that in my naiveté I thought the world was advancing towards peaceful solutions to conflicts but sadly it is not the case.

29.9.14 – Monday – Gili and I got back to the boat after flying from Israel to New York, then Aruba and Curacao; door to door time was close to 29 hours. We stopped on the way to the marina at the huge Magusa hypermarket to buy some stuff for breakfast and a few beers to celebrate our return. For the tired eyes everything seemed just fine, good voltage at the battery bank and no suspicious odors.

30.9.14 – Tuesday – Daylight showed that there was a lot of work ahead; a lot of dust accumulated all over the boat even finding its way into the interior. There was a lot of cleaning to accomplish but first we took the Vreugdenhil supermarket bus and shopped for food. Back in the marina, I went into the office, where Robert, the manager told me that my cooking gas composite tank, which I left to be refilled, was declared inoperable. I’ll have to buy a new one.

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                            Robert

The afternoon was work, work, work; while Gili was cleaning house I replaced the port alternator’s belts, a simple job that somehow took forever. I was promised by an electrician who came to check it that once I did it the alternator would operate normally. Wrong! It’ll have to be inspected by a better pro. Out of the engine room, hot and sweating, I jumped into the water to check the bottom and the props condition. I found them to be horribly fouled and spent half an hour diving to clean them.

1.10.14 – Wednesday – Long flight is the occasion to catch something bad; in my case  – a bad cold and gum inflammation, both treated by stuff we have on board – Vicks Vapor Rub for cold and swishing salt water for the gums. I told a Canadian couple, Dianne and Wade, on a boat next to us about the prop fouling  and Dianne said that every time they left the boat for a prolonged period, they covered the props with black plastic bags. You learn a new thing every day! I bought a new 11 lbs. gas tank at "Budget Marine"; at 245$ U.S – not cheap.

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                                 Wade and Dianne

Back on the boat there was more cleaning to be done. In difference to my regular habit of keeping the dinghy on the fore deck upside down when I leave to go home, this time I left it in its regular place on the platform between the transoms. It filled with rain water and dust, ingredients producing mud. As evening came we were actually ready to sail. Tomorrow we’ll leave the marina and go to the anchorage; on Friday we’ll do the departure procedure and go to Santa Cruz on the northwest of the island and on Saturday sail to Aruba.

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